Gaming PC

Posted on: January 31st, 2017 by Alexander Wright No Comments

Gaming PC’s can be a very expensive pass time, especially these days with 4k and HDR starting to become more prevalent. But not everyone needs a top of the line system, the trick is building something that can play current games at a good level and still be able to in at least 2-3 years time.

Here at User2 we build systems for everyone. Ranging from the high end of over £3000 to more modest offerings of  £800 (sometimes less if you do not require a monitor etc).

So how do you choose whats right for you?

New-4th-Gen-Core-K-Package_w_755

The average mid range Gaming PC is designed to run games at 1080p (standard hi-def) on what will usually be a 23-27″ monitor. This is mostly achieved by the graphics card but the CPU and RAM do come into play.

Here is an example of a mid range gaming PC.

 

CPU: Core i5

GPU: Geforce GTX 1060

RAM: 8gb ddr4

After these 3 crucial components the rest is more or less down to personal preference. Things like the Case, how much storage space you need, add-ons like WiFi, speakers and a monitor etc. These parts that are generic (to an extent) on every PC.

 

A low end PC, barely capable of running current games would be using something like this.

CPU: Core i3

GPU: Geforce GT740

Ram : 4gb

This is the average level of a home PC, although to be fair the majority would probably have an even worse or no dedicated graphics card at all. That’s the kind of thing you see people buying in PC world for £500 and thinking they are getting something excellent that will go for years and years.

 

Now as you are probably aware there is a near endless list of different PC components which is constantly changing. The trick is to be able to select not only parts that are compatible with each other but that give you the best value for money. A good example of this would be an Nvidia Geforce GTX1080, which currently retails at anything from £600 to £900. But for those that do not need (or cant afford) the cutting edge best on the market there is an alternative. The GTX 1070 for example gives you 80% of the power but for only 66% of the cost.

As you can see in the graph below the GTX1070 is not far behind it’s much more expensive counterpart and also outperforms a large selection previous generations best.

gtx-1070-3dmark

It is savings like this and knowing what parts are worth the cost that allows us to recommend the best system quotes and give true value for money. A lot of companies will shave a few pounds here and there to make the overall purchases an attractive price. But what they don’t tell you is that you may well get something 50% better for only 20% more outlay in costs.

When you start to look at the likes of PC world, HP, Dell and all the larger retailers in this way you soon realize it’s about selling customers what the company wants to, not something that’s actually value for money ! They aren’t about to tell you that you should buy the previous generation of an Intel CPU over the current one because that’s what they want to sell you.  The smart money however would be on the older one as it’s so close in power you are not going to notice and it’s nearly 15% cheaper (at the time of writing this).

So go on, next time you want to upgrade or make a new gaming PC why not call User2.

 

 

 

Alexander Wright Alexander Wright (44 Posts)